Light Weights, High Reps…and a long absence!

It has been a LONG, LONG time FIT friends. Apologies for our absence. But we have good excuses…FitTrition trainers have been busy!!

Here are a few exciting updates for you:

  1. Maggie Donnelly has joined the team! A professional actress in the DC Area, Maggie’s introduction to the fitness stage was by accident. Her 10+ years of ballet experience led her to help out a barre teacher who needed a last-minute sub. This quick decision turned out to be a total game changer as Maggie was instantly hooked on the rewarding experience of getting a group of strangers to laugh, scream and work on changing their bodies together. She has since added Pilates, Yoga and BOSU to the mix. She is an awesome addition to the FitTrition team and we are lucky to have her! Schedule a session with her TODAY. You won’t regret it…Screen Shot 2016-07-26 at 2.05.17 PM
  2. And…if you are a current client, you may have already met her, because she is taking over for FITintheCITY while she is on maternity leave!IMG_1332

As you can see, the FitTrition “team” is growing!

But we are back and committed to providing you all with the best in nutrition and exercise news, great healthy recipes, and tips for success when it comes to you and your health and wellness!

There was a recent article in The New York Times that seemed like a perfect place to re-start the blog: validation of what we have been telling you about how to exercise all these years. Light weights, high reps!

According to the article entitled “Lifting Lighter Weights Can Be Just as Effective as Heavy Ones” By Gretchen Reynolds, “Upending conventions about how best to strength train, a new study finds that people who lift relatively light weights can build just as much strength and muscle size as those who grunt through sessions using much heftier weights — if they plan their workouts correctly.” Stuart Phillips, a professor of kinesiology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, who has long studied muscles and exercise, started researching the effects of using lighter weights. He and his team of researchers found that as long as you were lifting to fatigue, the results were similar to a traditional strength program of lifting the heaviest thing possible very few times.

The study took 49 men and divided them into two groups. “One group was assigned to follow the standard regimen, in which weights were set at between 75 and 90 percent of the man’s one-repetition maximum and the volunteer lifted until he could not lift again, usually after about 10 repetitions. The other volunteers began the lighter routine. Their weights were set at between 30 and 50 percent of each man’s one-repetition maximum, and he lifted them as many as 25 times, until the muscles were exhausted. All of the volunteers performed three sets of their various lifts four times per week for 12 weeks. Then they returned to the lab to have muscle strength, size and health reassessed and their hormone levels re-measured. The results were unequivocal. There were no significant differences between the two groups. All of the men had gained muscle strength and size, and these gains were almost identical, whether they had lifted heavy or light weights.

This is great news of non-gym rats who find the idea of lifting heavy weights daunting and potentially dangerous (both of which can be true…). So pick up those 5 lbs. weights and lift away. Just make sure you are lifting to fatigue!

Check out this FIT-approved video that utilizes just this technique. (And watch for FITintheCITY to put this video to the test SOON!)

Let us know what you missed in our absence! Videos? Recipes? Life anecdotes? We are ready for suggestions!!

xoxo

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Your tummy and food sensitivity

Ever notice that your stomach hurts after eating ice cream, but you can have coffee with half and half and not have any problems? Or, have you ever heard of someone saying they are allergic to garlic? It may not actually be a real allergy, but there may be an explanation for what is going on!

What’s the Best Diet for IBS upset stomach cartoon

The article, “When Gluten Sensitivity Isn’t Celiac’s Disease” by Jane E. Brody in The New York Times “Well” section explains what be going on inside your gut:

“Recent studies have strongly suggested that many, and possibly most, people who react badly to gluten may have a more challenging problem: sensitivity to a long list of foods containing certain carbohydrates.

In 2011, Dr. Peter Gibson, a gastroenterologist at Monash University in Victoria, Australia, and his colleagues studied 34 people with irritable bowel syndrome who did not have celiac disease but reacted badly to wheat, a gluten-rich grain. The researchers concluded that non-celiac gluten sensitivity “may exist.”

Many of their subjects still had symptoms on a gluten-free diet, however, which prompted a second study of 37 patients with irritable bowel syndrome and non-celiac gluten sensitivity who were randomly assigned to a two-week diet low in certain carbohydrates, collectively called Fodmaps.

All patients on the special diet improved, but got significantly worse when fed gluten or whey protein. Only 8 percent of the participants reacted specifically to gluten, prompting the researchers to conclude that Fodmaps, not gluten, accounted for most of the distress.

Fodmaps is an acronym for fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols, sugars that draw water into the intestinal tract. They may be poorly digested or absorbed, and become fodder for colonic bacteria that produce gas and can cause abdominal distress. They are:

■ Fructose: A sugar prominent in apples, pears, watermelon, mangoes, grapes, blueberries, tomatoes and tomato concentrate, and all dried fruits; vegetables like sugar-snap peas, sweet peppers and pickles; honey; agave; and jams, dressings and drinks made with high-fructose corn syrup.

■ Lactose: The sugar in milk from cows, goats and sheep, present in ice cream, soft cheeses, sour cream and custard.

■ Fructans: Soluble fiber found in bananas, garlic, onions, leeks, artichokes, asparagus, beets, wheat and rye.

■ Galactans: Complex sugars prominent in dried peas and beans, soybeans, soy milk, broccoli, cabbage and brussels sprouts.

■ Polyols: The sugar alcohols (sweeteners) isomalt, mannitol, sorbitol and xylitol, present in stone fruits like avocado, cherries, peaches, plums and apricots.

People with irritable bowel syndrome often find that their symptoms lessen or disappear when avoiding foods rich in Fodmaps; however, it can take six to eight weeks on a low-Fodmap diet to see a significant improvement.”

I encourage you all to read the whole Times article and to take a hard look at the list of LOW Fodmap foods and HIGH Fodmap foods released on Stanford Healthcare’s website to see if you can start to narrow down what might be hurting your tummy. For example, parmesan and feta cheeses are LOW, while milk (ANY KIND – Goat too!) and creamy/cheesy sauces are HIGH. This certainly explains a lot for me. If I even look at something like fettuccine alfredo, my stomach starts to turn, but I can devour a cheese plate with ease and feel ok…come on folks – just a small cheese plate. I always assumed this had something to do with fat content, but it looks like I was wrong. Soy has also always been a big trigger for stomach pains, but it might also depend on type. Looks like soybeans (edamame) and soy milk are HIGH while tofu is LOW.

I have definitely been inspired by this article and am going to start a food journal to see if I can figure out my specific triggers. Won’t you join me?

xoxo

FITintheCITY